CMPA

Hopefully a new beginning at the CMPA (Canadian Medical Protective Association)

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Members will be pleased to learn that Dr. Hartley Stern has been appointed the incoming Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer of the CMPA.

Dr. Stern is a respected healthcare executive, and an experienced clinician and educator. He is currently the Executive Director of the Jewish General Hospital (JGH) in Montréal. As a result of Dr. Stern’s leadership, the hospital achieved impressive improvements in administrative efficiency and has been widely recognized for its patient safety advancements. JGH was one of the first hospitals in Québec to introduce public reporting of quality of care and patient safety indicators. As well, the Canadian Institute of Health Information (CIHI) recognized JGH as the most efficient hospital in Canada in 2012.

Dr. Stern understands the medico-legal needs of CMPA members and is dedicated to the Association’s fundamental principle of "doctors looking after doctors". His enthusiasm for risk management and patient safety improvements firmly aligns with the Association’s mandate of protection and safer medical care.

Members will find in Dr. Stern a seasoned leader, an advocate and a collaborator. As an experienced healthcare leader, he brings an understanding of the issues that are important to Canadian physicians and to our key stakeholders. He is fluent in both official languages and is known for working collaboratively to address a wide range of issues. We are truly fortunate that come the fall, we will rely on his leadership to steer us through the next chapter of our history.

A comprehensive handover will be initiated on September 30, 2013, which will see Dr. Stern and Dr. Gray working closely together. Once the transition is successfully completed in October, Dr. Gray will retire from the CMPA having served the Association for over 13 years.

Lawrence E. Groves, MD, MCFP
President John E. Gray, MD, CCFP, FCFP
Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer

What kind of new beginning do

What kind of new beginning do you envision? Puzzled Smiling

I don't know what he has

I don't know what he has planned, Janice, but Hartley Stern has always shaken things up wherever he's been. He is known for seeing things differently than most people, and coming up with novel approaches to old problems. His passion is patient safety and full disclosure in medical errors

Twain wrote: I don't know

Twain wrote:

I don't know what he has planned, Janice, but Hartley Stern has always shaken things up wherever he's been. He is known for seeing things differently than most people, and coming up with novel approaches to old problems. His passion is patient safety and full disclosure in medical errors

I've actually googled him, and I really like what I see. Love

I see things differently than most people too. Eye-wink

I think I understand my

I think I understand my confusion with the CMPA. There are those doctors who are members of the CMPA, and then there are the doctors who provide advice who are no longer practicing in a clinical setting.

It would be counterproductive for the CMPA to provide representation or assistance to patients. What doctor would belong to an organization which supported the very patients who were suing them?

However, it is in their best interest to promote patient safety. Less money would be shoveled out to lawyers and injured patients. If they truly are a nonprofit organization doctors yearly dues would decrease. It would be a win win situation for doctors and patients.

Reducing the number of medical errors should be their number one priority.

gagal wrote: It would be

gagal wrote:

It would be counterproductive for the CMPA to provide representation or assistance to patients. What doctor would belong to an organization which supported the very patients who were suing them?

As a nurse, I would be happy to belong to an organization which would protect my patients as well as me. I am not perfect, and cannot expect to be perfect, and if I were to cause harm because of human error or a learning need (personal or system related), I would feel better giving an apology (which may or may not be accepted), and knowing that the patient and/or family was compensated.

And definitely - I would not want any further unnecessary harm to happen.

gagal wrote:

However, it is in their best interest to promote patient safety. Less money would be shoveled out to lawyers and injured patients. If they truly are a nonprofit organization doctors yearly dues would decrease. It would be a win win situation for doctors and patients.

I think nurses and other health-care providers should be protected by the CMPA too. It could be a win-win for everyone.

gagal wrote:

Reducing the number of medical errors should be their number one priority.

Absolutely! Healthcare has changed since the CMPA first started up; they must change as well, in my opinion.

wishandaprayer wrote: As a

wishandaprayer wrote:

As a nurse, I would be happy to belong to an organization which would protect my patients as well as me. I am not perfect, and cannot expect to be perfect, and if I were to cause harm because of human error or a learning need (personal or system related), I would feel better giving an apology (which may or may not be accepted), and knowing that the patient and/or family was compensated.

As a nurse you would be happy to pay an organization that used YOUR money to help a patient sue you?

I think you are presuming every lawsuit is valid. What if you did nothing wrong? You followed “the standard of care” and an adverse event occurred which was beyond your control? The very organization, which you are paying to help you, is now helping the patient.

You don’t see a conflict of interest?

I agree; other members of the medical community should be allowed to belong to the CMPA.

gagal wrote: As a nurse you

gagal wrote:

As a nurse you would be happy to pay an organization that used YOUR money to help a patient sue you?

Definitely! The system Canada uses now is PATIENTS ultimately pay the CMPA to help DEFEND doctors against complaints to the College and lawsuits.

gagal wrote:

I think you are presuming every lawsuit is valid. What if you did nothing wrong? You followed “the standard of care” and an adverse event occurred which was beyond your control? The very organization, which you are paying to help you, is now helping the patient.

In my special little wisherworld, there would be evidence based investigations. I would learn from the mistakes I made, if any, or feel better knowing that there was nothing I could have done differently at that time. I would be able to take accountability, if necessary, and move on, knowing that the patient who was harmed would be more likely to forgive me and I would be more likely to forgive myself. Further unnecessary harm would be the goal. There would be much less shaming - whether I did something wrong, or I didn't. The incident would be resolved in a timely, efficent manner.

gagal wrote:

You don’t see a conflict of interest?

Right now, I see that there is no justice with the current system. Do you see justice with the current system?

gagal wrote:

I agree; other members of the medical community should be allowed to belong to the CMPA.

Nurses are protected by the hospital and their union, and can buy extra protection. So much protection - but I'm conflicted because I want my patients to be protected.

LOL - that's why I'm not nursing right now. I'd rather starve.

But - if I were a doctor, and suffering from Medical Malpractice Stress Syndrome, I might have lots of bills that needed paying, and would just have to do whatever I had to do to survive. Tired

And I would hope the CMPA would defend me. Smiling

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