Specialist vs PCP

I'm confused, if you see a specialist (self referred insurance does not require a primary)for a condition every 6 months for 3 years and are stable, are you then expected to transfer your care to a pcp for maintenance?
I remember the days when you went to one dr for everything. My specialist seemed annoyed wth me at my last appointment.
I don't know what the proper etiquette is? Thanks

Being north of the 49th, the

Being north of the 49th, the insurance rules which play into my care are not exactly in alignment with those in the US, but the concept is not significantly different.

PCPs refer to specialists for their expertise in diagnosing and treating patients their patients. That's primarily for the patient's benefit, but it obviously figures into the PCP's liability to the patient as well.

If the patient is stabilized on a successful treatment regimen, a specialist's involvement in the absence of possible relapse of the patient, may not be needed. Where there is no additional benefit to the patient over their having their established treatment continued by the PCP, why would insurance pay for a specialist?

I've only had to continue with specialists during periods of evaluation and changes in my treatment, with my PCPs continuing treatment while I was stable. For instance, only when my pain control became less certain, my PCP would refer me back to my pain doc. Given that my therapy included narcotic analgesics within an interactive drug ****tail, I'd also be referred back annually, to have my pain doc re-establish the regimen, thus allowing my PCP to rely on an expert's evaluation and established treatment.

MicOnTheNorthShore

MicOnTheNorthShore wrote:

Given that my therapy included narcotic analgesics within an interactive drug ****tail ...

I see that the language filter is back. I guess I shouldn't mention that a couple of my specialists graduated from McGill and Harvard medical schools, magna cum laude.

Thanks for the responses, the

Thanks for the responses, the thing is I don't have a primary care physician right now, my insurance doesn't require it and my last one retired, so I was trying to wing it...but I guess I should get one.

hydrangea wrote: Thanks for

hydrangea wrote:

Thanks for the responses, the thing is I don't have a primary care physician right now, my insurance doesn't require it and my last one retired, so I was trying to wing it...but I guess I should get one.

I think it's a prudent move to always have a PCP. One never knows when some problem will arise, and having a physician who is familiar with the patient's history can only make things easier. If your specialist is for chronic illnes such as diabetes or pain management, it might be an idea to see them once a year for re-evaluation and affirmation of treatment.

I made an appointment with a

I made an appointment with a young dr I saw in 2009 (good thing I did, earliest appointment is April), I'll give him a chance as a PCP.
However, I am one of those horrid patients that likes to pick and choose what tests and treatments I'll go along with, lol.
We'll see how it goes...

hydrangea wrote: I made an

hydrangea wrote:

I made an appointment with a young dr I saw in 2009 (good thing I did, earliest appointment is April), I'll give him a chance as a PCP.
However, I am one of those horrid patients that likes to pick and choose what tests and treatments I'll go along with, lol.
We'll see how it goes...

Just try to resist calling your doctor, "Grasshopper". Laughing out loud

Fibromyalgia is a

Fibromyalgia is a multi-system condition that might require you to visit other doctors in addition to your primary care physician. Below is a list of specialists that you might need to see and why.

http://www.display.ie/

I cancelled my pcp

I cancelled my pcp appointment already!
I'll take my chances with the walk-in Urgent Care place for now.
I can't stand meeting new drs...too stressful!

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