The Pitchman for Lipitor

Dr. Robert Jarvik, inventor of the Jarvik heart is the doc in the Lipitor ad rowing his boat.

Dr. Jarvik says he gets paid "a lot" for the ad, but will not divulde the exact amount.

Interesting facts about Dr. Jarvik: He is in fact a medical doctor, but he has never practiced medicine and in fact is not licensed to practice (so it's a good thing he has not!).

He attended medical school in Italy because his grades were not good enough for an American medical school. He did then "transfer" to an American medical school and received a med degree.

Congress wants an investigation into why Dr. Jarvik was grabbed to do this ad; if he actually does take Lipitor, as he states he does and how much he was paid.

The Jarvik heart was in essence, a failure. Yet, the ad seems soooooo "doctorish", with Dr. Jarvik in his white coat.

You decide.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16039753/

http://blogs.wsj.com/health/2008/01/07/congress-to-pfizer-why-is-robert-jarvik-the-lipitor-man/

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/OnCall/Story?id=4138702&page=2

Hi ChronicPilomath,welcome

Hi ChronicPilomath,welcome back!! So are you saying that drugs are over endorsed?? If that is what your saying,then yes I agree. What I don't understand is,why would one have to remain on the medication,if their numbers are in range. Have a great night.

Msdoodle wrote:Hi

Msdoodle wrote:

Hi ChronicPilomath,welcome back!! So are you saying that drugs are over endorsed?? If that is what your saying,then yes I agree. What I don't understand is,why would one have to remain on the medication,if their numbers are in range. Have a great night.

Hi Ms. Doodle!!

As I've stated in Pam's post about this issue, the ad is misleading. Jarvik, in his white coat, looks like a practicing medical doctor which he is not. Then, there is a body double for the rowing portion...hmmmm....
He sold out for the money and now he could be in trouble.

Continuing to take a statin when the cholesterol numbers are in normal range is a question for the doctors to answer. It's my non-medical school opinion that a statin should only be ingested if cholesterol is over 300 (not recommended by doctors) and that's why I won't take it. I've had a few cardiologists' get very angry with me over this medication and of course I won't go back to them. Statins do a lot of harm to the body and now there are rumblings that statins can be a cause of dementia, among many other unwanted things.

Ms. Doodle, I so glad you're back here Smiling Smiling Have a good day.
Sasse

Thank you very much

Thank you very much Sasse,but I'm looking for a new posting place.I didn't come here looking for free handouts from the doctors,as one has accused me of doing. I really appreciated the good folks here,their hard to come by these days. Stay sweet. & Huge hugs. Smiling

Msdoodle wrote:I'm looking

Msdoodle wrote:

I'm looking for a new posting place.I didn't come here looking for free handouts from the doctors,as one has accused me of doing. I really appreciated the good folks here,their hard to come by these days. Stay sweet. & Huge hugs. Smiling

Hi Snickerdoodle:

You have to ignore those comments. You have to take the good with the bad. It happens on every forum or blog site. Pick what you want and can use and leave the rest.

Hugs,
Pam

Good article I was on

Smiling Good article Smiling I was on lypitor, and my doctor from the past, told me that it could cause severe muscle damage, that could also cause kidney damage...he told me to go off them and see how i felt...i can stretch my legs without painful cramping, my kidneys don't hurt as much, my left arm was cramping so bad, it took my breath away, now i can bend it....
I have also seen that commerical...I find that to sell something, that people may think will help, they, the companys, would do anything for money....they misinform the public, and forget to tell the public about the serious side effects....Bob was on Crestor, he stopped his too because he felt terrible...his doctor said, 'oh you only need to keep an eye on the liver"....funny how many doctors have no idea of what really goes on, or their opinions are so far away from their collegues, its not only confusing, its dangerous Jawdropping! Jawdropping!

No one seems to be on the same page....Both crestor and Lipator are very expensive here, over $100 per month for each prescription...imagine selling to millions....a tidy profit, I would say... Puzzled but it's not about money is it?, its about making us better, so what if your liver, kidneys, or muscles are damaged...they figure your just whinning anyways... Shocked...go figure....and give you another med for that...and then when you get bloated, constipated, gain tons of weight, feel not your self, have depression, anxiety, and stress, your back hurts, your vision is blurred, you have night sweats, your mind is either racing, or so slow, your forgetful, dummy like, you hurt all over, continual flu symptoms, plus the added costs, they say you just need to drink more water and exercise.....wow..and look at dr.jarvik....he's such a healthy devil Eye-wink Eye-wink I bet he's petrified to take the med? Laughing out loud Laughing out loud

have a great day... Sherry S.

Sherry, Well said!! It will

Sherry,

Well said!!

It will be interesting to see what comes of this investigation with Jarvik and the drug company. Does he really take Lipitor?? I believe no way in hell.

Sally Field does the Boniva (to prevent bone loss) commerical and also claims that she takes the drug.

As most of you know, I'm a

As most of you know, I'm a commercial artist, so I think I know a little about making products seem indispensable to the public. They pay us big bucks to make you run to your nearest store, doctor or beauty supply.

Don't take my word for it. Try an experiment. Stand at the doorway of a room that looks small or cluttered to you. Now, go stand in the same place with your camera and take a photo. Compare the photo to what you see with the naked eye. The photographed version looks better. You've just entered the realm of advertising.

I remember several years ago, I was watching an old movie with my grandmother, who has arthritis. A commercial popped up about Vioxx. The drug my grandmother's doctor had refused to prescribe, was being endorsed by a healthy-looking celebrity. Gran was furious at her doctor for being so cruel. Later, she was happy he hadn't prescribed it.

The celebrities that are pictured in these commercials get exposure to the public, as well as a fee. Do they use the hair-dye; the pantyhose, or the medicine? I doubt it! Can you see an actress that can demand two hundred, fifty thousand for a commercial dying her hair at the kitchen sink? Laughing out loud

The physician in the Lipitor commercial is a Cardiologist/celebrity. Does he take the medication? Who knows? The pharmaceutical company doesn't care and neither does the advertising company. They do, however, care about the consumer's reaction to the ad. If the reaction is positive,(you run to your doctor and demand the medication), then everyone, except maybe you, wins.

Be careful! There are places on the Internet that explain the action, dosage, etc of drugs. Your physician, if you trust h/her, can also explain why you should, or shouldn't be on the particular medication. Smiling

Cristal_Artist wrote:......

Cristal_Artist wrote:

...... I know a little about making products seem indispensable to the public........

I remember my son running to me after watching commercials insisting that he NEEDED whatever was being advertised, and that he must call 1-800-xxx-xxxx immediately to order it.

Later, when poeple would ask him his phone number, he would answer: "1-800-...."

Twain wrote:Cristal_Artist

Twain wrote:
Cristal_Artist wrote:

...... I know a little about making products seem indispensable to the public........

I remember my son running to me after watching commercials insisting that he NEEDED whatever was being advertised, and that he must call 1-800-xxx-xxxx immediately to order it.

Later, when poeple would ask him his phone number, he would answer: "1-800-...."

heehheee.

But how many patients come in and ask for your the drug they saw advertised during the evening news?

Twain wrote:Cristal_Artist

Twain wrote:
Cristal_Artist wrote:

...... I know a little about making products seem indispensable to the public........

I remember my son running to me after watching commercials insisting that he NEEDED whatever was being advertised, and that he must call 1-800-xxx-xxxx immediately to order it.

Later, when poeple would ask him his phone number, he would answer: "1-800-...."

LOL. Maybe some of us an advantage over some. Me, being once in broadcasting, I know how some these things work. Listen to the commercials adverstising these meds. They always say.... and if you have this, this and this...serious side effects may occur. Here are side effects and damage. See your dr. Come on. Don't people get a clue????

ChronicPhilomath wrote:Twain

ChronicPhilomath wrote:
Twain wrote:
Cristal_Artist wrote:

...... I know a little about making products seem indispensable to the public........

I remember my son running to me after watching commercials insisting that he NEEDED whatever was being advertised, and that he must call 1-800-xxx-xxxx immediately to order it.

Later, when poeple would ask him his phone number, he would answer: "1-800-...."

heehheee.

But how many patients come in and ask for your the drug they saw advertised during the evening news?

Many. And I have to explain to them that the drug advertised may be good for the actor pitching it, but not necessarily for them. The most common question comes from perfectly normal individuals with absolutely no risk factors for heart disease who want to take Aspirin. I have to explian to them that for THEM the risk of GI bleeding is greater than the small potential benefit from the drug.

Twain wrote: Many. And I

Twain wrote:

Many. And I have to explain to them that the drug advertised may be good for the actor pitching it, but not necessarily for them. The most common question comes from perfectly normal individuals with absolutely no risk factors for heart disease who want to take Aspirin. I have to explian to them that for THEM the risk of GI bleeding is greater than the small potential benefit from the drug.

Hi Twain,I don't know about the folks there,but I never went in to any of my doctors asking for drugs,especially a statin drug. How would one know if their levels are normal or not without blood tests, I certainly can't feel them being high nor low. Have a great day. Smiling

Msdoodle wrote:Twain

Msdoodle wrote:
Twain wrote:

Many. And I have to explain to them that the drug advertised may be good for the actor pitching it, but not necessarily for them. The most common question comes from perfectly normal individuals with absolutely no risk factors for heart disease who want to take Aspirin. I have to explian to them that for THEM the risk of GI bleeding is greater than the small potential benefit from the drug.

Hi Twain,I don't know about the folks there,but I never went in to any of my doctors asking for drugs,especially a statin drug. How would one know if their levels are normal or not without blood tests, I certainly can't feel them being high nor low. Have a great day. Smiling

An example of what I see every day would be a patient on Crestor (a statin) asking me why he's not on Lipitor (another statin) because he saw Dr. Jarvik telling him it was what he recommended.... the implication being: "If it's good enough for someone famous like Dr. J, why am I getting second best (because surely Dr. J would only recommend the very best)?"

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